COP Week 5 Training

COMPLETE YOUR MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION
This is the week you will need to decide whether or not to join.  We will handle this through what we call "Inprocessing Night".  During this meeting you will take care of all the required items of processing your application.  This includes turning in your local dues payment, taking your membership ID photo, issuing uniforms, and an interview between you, your parents/guardians, and the Squadron Commander.  As you can see, that is a lot to go through, so it is vitally important that you complete your membership application online on time and attend the Week Five meeting.  The information on how to complete your membership application is included on the "Cadet Orientation Program Contact Sheet + Membership Info" handout you received in Week 2.  If you lost that, please contact your Cadet Instructors for a replacement.

CAP HISTORY
In the late 1930s, more than 150,000 volunteers with a love for aviation argued for an organization to put their planes and flying skills to use in defense of their country.  As a result, the Civil Air Patrol was born one week prior to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  Thousands of volunteer members answered America's call to national service and sacrifice by accepting and performing critical wartime missions. Assigned to the War Department under the jurisdiction of the Army Air Corps, the contributions of Civil Air Patrol, including logging more than 500,000 flying hours, attacking enemy submarines, and saving hundreds of crash victims during World War II, are well documented.

After the war, a thankful nation understood that Civil Air Patrol could continue providing valuable services to both local and national agencies.  On July 1, 1946, President Harry Truman signed Public Law 476 incorporating Civil Air Patrol as a benevolent, nonprofit organization.  On May 26, 1948, Congress passed Public Law 557 permanently establishing Civil Air Patrol as the auxiliary of the new U.S. Air Force.  Three primary mission areas were set forth at that time: aerospace education, cadet programs, and emergency services.

If you want to learn more about Civil Air Patrol's history, visit the Civil Air Patrol National History Program.


REQUIRED PAPERWORK
Whenever you attend a CAP Activity outside of our local facility, there are a few forms you will need to have with you.  The first is called the CAPF 161 - Emergency Information.  Your cadet instructors will show you how to fill that out.  The second form is called the CAPF 32 - Civil Air Patrol Cadet Activity Permission Slip.  You can see an example of this here.  You will have a copy of this e-mailed to you for each activity with the activity information already filled in.  All that would be required is to complete your information, get the signatures, and turn the form in as directed by the activity's Project Officer.  This form is mandatory for all activities outside of the base or the airport.  If you do not bring it, you cannot attend.


UNIFORMS 4
Insignia Backings
You will notice that the length of the pins on the back of your insignia are much longer than needed to go through the fabric of your uniform.  This becomes a problem on your Blues uniform shirt.  If you just wear the insignia with nothing supporting it, they will hang loosely - giving an unprofessional appearance.  The collar insignia are usually okay on their own since the collar material if thicker.  The pin-on insignia on the shirt - such as the nameplate, ribbons, or specialty insignia - will need what we call a "backing".  You will need to cut either a 1/8" thick piece of white cardboard or white foam core to match the shape of each insignia.  It is important that the backing is white since it will show through the shirt if it is a darker color.  You will pin through this backing on the inside of your shirt, placing it between the fabric and the clutch-back fasteners (sometimes called "frogs".)  The result is a crisp, professional appearance.

Insignia and Patches
Placing your insignia and patches correctly is a very important part of cadet life.  It shows Esprit De Corps - pride in your unit and yourself.  It shows attention to detail - an important trait in any walk of life dealing with accuracy.  It shows professionalism - it helps create a good first impression.  Your fellow members will judge your abilities on the image your uniform portrays.  Showing that you can wear the uniform correctly shows that you can be trusted with more critical, sometimes even lifesaving, tasks.  Wearing it incorrectly shows that you cannot take care of the most basic parts of being a member and should not be trusted with more advanced items.  Don't be that person.  Wear it right every time and set the good example!

These are the diagrams from the CAPM 39-1 showing how insignia are placed on the Blues Uniform.  We have also modified these to show you exactly how your uniform should look as a new Cadet Airman Basic.  Remember, as a new Cadet Airman Basic, you will not have the badges, grade insignia, and ribbons.  These must be earned.  The only insignia you will start off with is the nameplate.  That is the navy blue rectangular insignia shown on the wearer's right/viewer's left.  The tie bar or tie tac is optional, but if worn is centered on the tie between the tip and the bottom of the knot.

Male Blues Class B Uniform as a Cadet Airman Basic

Male Class B Blues as a Cadet Airman Basic

Male Blues Class B Uniform with Insignia Earned as you Promote
Male Class B Blues with Earned Insignia

Female Blues Class B Uniform
as a Cadet Airman Basic
Female Class B Blues as a Cadet Airman Basic

Female Blues Class B Uniform with Insignia Earned as you Promote
Female Class B Blues with Earned Insignia


This is a modified diagram from the Civil Air Patrol Airman Battle Uniform Wear Instructions showing how insignia are placed on the Airman Battle Uniform (ABU's). The ABU's are the new Civil Air Patrol field uniform and we will be transitioning all members who meet requirements into this uniform as supplies become available.  Again, we have also modified it to show you exactly how your uniform should look as a new Cadet Airman Basic.  As a Cadet Airman Basic, you will not have the badges and grade insignia. These must be earned. The only insignia you will start off with are the dark blue nametape and Civil Air Patrol tape.  You will wear a desert sand t-shirt under the coat, a tan rigger belt, black boots, and the ABU Cap with this uniform.  The uniform is worn identically for males and females although there are specific male and female versions of this uniform.  The fabric on the coat and trousers must match (either both twill or both ripstop).

Airman Battle Uniform as a Cadet Airman Basic
Airman Battle Uniform as a Cadet Airman Basic

Airman Battle Uniform with Insignia Earned as you Promote
Airman Battle Uniform as a Cadet NCO

This is a modified diagram from the CAPM 39-1 showing how insignia are placed on the Battle Dress Uniform (BDU's). Again, we have also modified it to show you exactly how your uniform should look as a new Cadet Airman Basic.  As a Cadet Airman Basic, you will not have the badges and grade insignia. These must be earned. The only insignia you will start off with are the dark blue nametape and Civil Air Patrol tape.  You will wear a black t-shirt under the coat, a black rigger belt, black boots, and the BDU Cap or squadron cap with this uniform.  The uniform is unisex and is worn identically for males and females. The fabric on the coat and trousers must match (either both twill or both ripstop).  This uniform is being retired and will be completely phased out by June 2021.

Battle Dress Uniform as a Cadet Airman Basic
Battle Dress Uniform as a Cadet Airman Basic

Battle Dress Uniform with Insignia Earned as you Promote
Battle Dress Uniform as a Cadet NCO

CUSTOMS AND COURTESIES 3
Civil Air Patrol Policy of Nondiscrimination
It is Civil Air Patrol policy that no member shall be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or subjected to discrimination in any CAP program or activity on the basis of race, sex, age, color, religion, national origin, or disability (formerly handicap). It is Civil Air Patrol policy that no applicant meeting CAP’s minimum age requirement will be denied membership in CAP on the basis of race, sex, age, color, religion, national origin, or disability (formerly handicap). 

“Qualified Member with a Disability” means a CAP member with a disability who, either with or without reasonable accommodation, can perform the essential functions required by a CAP program or activity that such CAP member desires to participate in without endangering him/herself, other CAP members, or CAP property.

Conduct 

- Civil Air Patrol standards of conduct apply both on and off duty, in your personal behavior, in your treatment of others, and in both military and civilian environments.

- Public displays of affection, such as hand-holding, embracing, or walking arm-in-arm, are inappropriate actions for members in any CAP uniform. Indiscriminate displays of affection in public detract from the professional image the Civil Air Patrol intends to project.

- You may not use government facilities or equipment for other than officially approved activities.

- You may not gamble or bet while on government owned or leased property or while on duty, unless specifically authorized.

- You may not engage in any conduct that is illegal, dishonest, or otherwise brings discredit on the Civil Air Patrol.


Our Reputation

We all have reputations; how you act determines whether it is good or bad. Most people prefer a good reputation and luckily as a CAP cadet, that reputation has been earned by the actions of past cadets. It is your duty as current cadets to maintain it. We do this by self-policing, meaning that we help our wingmen by providing tactful reminders whenever an infraction occurs. This helps ensure that repeated mistakes do not become improper learned behaviors. Also, be sure to exercise situational awareness. Observe your surroundings, think about what the correct action should be, and carry out that correct action.



CAP INTERNET OPERATIONS
Using CAP's various internet resources is extremely important to your progress as a cadet.  Items like promotion testing and signing up for activities are all handled online.  Your Cadet Instructors will walk you through using the following websites:
  •     eServices - This is the official Civil Air Patrol Member Portal where you will complete online testing, online training, manage your personnel record, and more.
  •     Ohio Wing Account - This is your official CAP e-mail account and access to the whole suite of Google applications tailored to CAP.  Starting off you will mainly just need to access your e-mail on here at least twice a week.  This will be available to you to set up a week or two after joining.
  •     Squadron Website - You're already here! This is where we publicly post important information for our squadron.  Feel free to browse around and learn more about our squadron.  Here are some important areas.
    •         Calendar - This is where we will post all squadron activities.
    •         Activities - This page contains a majority of our activity sign-ups for your convenience.
    •         Squadron Publications and Policies - This is where you can find a collection of policies specific to our unit, such as promotion deadlines.